Because more equal societies work better for everyone

Tax and Social Security

While the UK's benefits system is progressive, our tax system places a disproportionately heavy burden on the poorest when compared to the richest, exacerbating the UK's already extreme levels of inequality. 
Almost everyone agrees that work should be a way out of poverty and a route towards greater prosperity.
On Sunday the Work and Pensions Secretary was featured in the news talking about the behavioural effects of changes to social security.
Single parents receiving Universal Credit and working for the minimum wage will be worse off even after receiving the new, higher minimum wage today (the 'National Living Wage').
If newspaper coverage is to be believed, one of the Government’s main themes for tomorrow’s Budget is housing - helping people to get on the housing ladder and helping people pass their house on to their children.
This is a guest blog kindly provided by Emily Kenway from the Fair Tax Mark campaign
Is a mother who has just given birth and is sitting in her hospital bed, by definition, work-shy? Is a father who raises three young kids full time while his partner works by definition work-shy? If you answered no to those questions, congratulations!
This morning the Resolution Foundation released a report detailing something 
Yesterday’s Panama Papers leak exposed the huge scale of tax avoidance and evasion among the world’s rich and powerful. It is a timely reminder of the vast inequalities that exist between the richest and the rest of us.  
Today’s joint Autumn Statement and Spending Review was touted as one of the most important in years. Planned cuts to tax credits announced in the Budget had led to a series of dire predictions for those on low incomes, and numerous negative headlines.

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