Because more equal societies work better for everyone

Income and Employment

Ensure legislation on pay ratios is backed by action to reduce income inequality, says The Equality Trust

Commenting on the BEIS announcement on corporate governance and pay ratios, Dr Wanda Wyporska, Executive Director of The Equality Trust said:

“Legislation forcing companies to publish their pay ratios is long overdue, given that a FTSE 100 CEO now earns an average (median) annual pay of £3.45 million [1], per year, a staggering 242 times more than that of a minimum wage worker.

Fat Cat Thursday - UK's Top Bosses 'Earn' 242 times the Minimum Wage Worker's Annual Salary

UK's Top Bosses 'Earn' 242 times the Minimum Wage Worker's Annual Salary

A FTSE 100 CEO now earns an average (median) annual pay of £3.45 million[1], per year, which is 242 times more than that of a minimum wage worker. Top bosses' pay will have surpassed the annual salary of a minimum wage worker on Thursday 4th January.

Analysis by The Equality Trust found the average pay for a FTSE 100 CEO is:

●       108 times more than a nurse’s.

●       91 times more than a teacher’s.

●       84 times more than a police officer’s.

A-Levels - Education Alone Cannot Level the Playing Field Between Rich and Poor

Responding to today's A-level results, Dr. Wanda Wyporska, Executive Director of The Equality Trust, said:

"They'll be some anxious parents and students this morning, but for many students from poorer backgrounds the battle doesn't end here, sadly.

"We know that in many professions, privately educated students receive significantly higher pay than their state school counterparts, even when they've received exactly the same degree from the same university. We also know there is a huge class pay gap in many top jobs. 

Equality Trust Response to BBC Salaries

The Equality Trust has responded to the BBC's publication of 'star' salaries

Dr. Wanda Wyporska, Executive Director of The Equality Trust, said:

"It's clear there are some extraordinary salaries being paid at the BBC, but this isn't the real issue. The problem is the huge disparities in pay we see in many large organisations. Often a small group at the top is paid astronomical amounts while those at the bottom are seen as a cost to be reduced. 

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